Spacewalks – the blue sky below us [32 Pics]

Spacewalks - Blue Sky: Astronauts Robert L. Curbeam, Jr.- left - and Christer Fuglesang

Blue Bath
STS-116 Mission Specialists Robert L. Curbeam, Jr. (left) and Christer Fuglesang participate in the first of the mission’s three planned sessions of extravehicular activity as construction resumes on the International Space Station. Spacewalks – Blue Sky: 2006 credit: NASA

Introduction

Breathtaking views of Spacewalks with our blue planet below. Space Shuttle Discovery made its last appearance to ISS and the Astronauts had a few Spacewalks. We have put together the best, and most breathtaking images of these spacewalks and previous spacewalks throughout history.

Facts: Extra-vehicular activity (EVA) is work done by an astronaut away from the Earth, and outside of a spacecraft. The term most commonly applies to an EVA made outside a craft orbiting Earth (a spacewalk)

Hint: Use “J” and “K” keys to navigate from picture to picture.

Spacewalks - Blue Sky: Astronaut Randolph Bresnik

Hello!
Astronaut Randolph Bresnik seen during Atlantis EVA-2 on 21 November 2009 with the unfurled AIS antenna, attached to Columbus to be used for experimental tracking of VHF signals of ships at sea. Spacewalks – Blue Sky: credit: NASA

Spacewalks - Blue Sky: Space, Horizon, Endeavour

Space, Horizon, Endeavour
Backdropped by the blackness of space and Earth’s horizon, Space Shuttle Endeavour, docked to the Pressurized Mating Adapter on the International Space Station, is featured in this photograph taken during the mission’s first planned spacewalk. Spacewalks – Blue Sky: credit: NASA

Spacewalks - Blue Sky: ATV at about 20 km from ISS

ATV at about 20 km from ISS
Spacewalks – Blue Sky: credit: ESA/NASA/Paulo Nespoli

Spacewalks - Blue Sky: Aurora Borealis

Blue Aurora Borealis
Spacewalks – Blue Sky: credit: Unkown

Spacewalks - Blue Sky: NASA astronaut Nicholas Patrick

NASA astronaut Nicholas Patrick
, STS-130 mission specialist, participates in the mission’s third and final session of extravehicular activity (EVA) as construction and maintenance continue on the International Space Station. During the five-hour, 48-minute spacewalk, Patrick and astronaut Robert Behnken (out of frame), mission specialist, completed all of their planned tasks, removing insulation blankets and removing launch restraint bolts from each of the Cupola’s seven windows. Spacewalks – Blue Sky: credit: NASA

Spacewalks - Blue Sky: Hello Discovery

Hello Discovery
Spacewalks – Blue Sky: credit: NASA/ESA/Paulo Nespoli

Spacewalks - Blue Sky: Our Blue Planet

Our Blue Planet
Spacewalks – Blue Sky: credit: NASA

Spacewalks - Blue Sky: Astronaut Rick Mastracchio

 

Astronaut Rick Mastracchio
During the 5-hour, 28-minute spacewalk on 15 Aug. 2007, STS-118 mission specialist, participates in the mission’s third planned session of extravehicular activity (EVA) as construction and maintenance continue on the International Space Station. Spacewalks – Blue Sky: credit: NASA

Spacewalks - Blue Sky: Astronauts Clay Anderson- left, and Astronaut Rick Mastracchio

 

Astronauts Clay Anderson (left), and Astronaut Rick Mastracchio
15 Aug. 2007 — Astronauts Clay Anderson (left), Expedition 15 flight engineer; and Rick Mastracchio, STS-118 mission specialist, participate in the mission’s third planned session of extravehicular activity (EVA) as construction and maintenance continue on the International Space Station.Spacewalks – Blue Sky: credit: NASA

Spacewalks - Blue Sky: The ISS casts a shadow on Discovery

 

The ISS casts a shadow on Discovery
Spacewalks – Blue Sky: credit: NASA/ESA/Paolo Nespoli

Spacewalks - Blue Sky: Space Shuttle Discovery

 

Space Shuttle Discovery
October 25, 2007 – Backdropped by a blue and white Earth, Space Shuttle Discovery approaches the International Space Station during STS-120 rendezvous and docking operations. Spacewalks – Blue Sky: credit: NASA

Spacewalks - Blue Sky:

 

Astronauts Steve Bowen and Al Drew working outside the ISS
It’s a hard job, but somebody has to do it! Spacewalks – Blue Sky: credit: NASA/Paulo Nespoli

Spacewalks - Blue Sky: Astronaut Clay Anderson

 

Astronaut Clay Anderson
Aug 15, 2007 – The blackness of space and Earth’s horizon provide the backdrop for the scene. Spacewalks – Blue Sky: credit: NASA

Spacewalks - Blue sky: Space Shuttle Endeavour

 

Space Shuttle Endeavour
15 Aug. 2007 — Backdropped by a blue and white Earth and the blackness of space, Space Shuttle Endeavour, docked to the Destiny laboratory of the International Space Station, is featured in this image photographed by a crewmember during the STS-118 mission’s third planned session of extravehicular activity (EVA). Spacewalks – Blue Sky: credit: NASA.

Spacewalks - Blue Sky: Astronaut Astronaut Bruce McCandless II

 

Floating Free – Astronaut Bruce McCandless II
In February 1984, Mission Specialist Bruce McCandless II went further away from the confines and safety of his ship than any previous astronaut had ever been. This space first was made possible by the Manned Manuevering Unit or MMU, a nitrogen jet propelled backpack. After a series of test maneuvers inside and above Challenger’s payload bay, McCandless went “free-flying” to a distance of 320 feet away from the Orbiter. This stunning orbital panorama view shows McCandless out there amongst the black and blue of Earth and space. Spacewalks – Blue Sky: credit: NASA

Spacewalks - Blue Sky: The southern extremities of Greenland

 

The southern extremities of Greenland
Spacewalks – Blue Sky: credit: NASA

Spacewalks - Blue Sky: Astronaut Robert L. Stewart

 

Astronaut Robert L. Stewart
NASA Astronaut Robert L. Stewart Floats Above Cloudy Earth During an Untethered Extravehicular Activity (EVA) , February 1984. Spacewalks – Blue Sky: credit: NASA

Spacewalks - Blue Sky: NASA astronauts Alvin Drew and Steve Bowen

 

28 Feb. 2011) — NASA astronauts Alvin Drew and Steve Bowen
They performed many tasks but among them exposed the Japanese “Message in a Bottle” experiment to space. Spacewalks – Blue Sky: credit: NASA

Spacewalks - Blue Sky: The Hubble Space Telescope

 

The Hubble Space Telescope
The Hubble Space Telescope floats above Earth after its release from the shuttle Discovery, at the end of a successful servicing mission in 1999. Spacewalks – Blue Sky: credit: NASA

Spacewalks - Blue Sky:

 

11 April 2010, NASA astronaut Rick Mastracchio
Spacewalks – Blue Sky: credit: NASA

Spacewalks - Blue Sky: Space Shuttle Endeavour's Remote Manipulator System

Space Shuttle Endeavour’s Remote Manipulator System
15 Nov. 2008 – Space Shuttle Endeavour’s Remote Manipulator System/Orbiter Boom Sensor System (RMS/OBSS) is featured in this image photographed by an STS-126 crewmember aboard the shuttle. Earth’s horizon and the blackness of space provide the backdrop for the scene.Spacewalks – Blue Sky: credit: NASA

Spacewalks - Blue Sky: Astronaut Steve Bowen

24 Nov. 2008, Astronaut Steve Bowen
Spacewalks – Blue Sky: credit: NASA

Spacewalks - Blue Sky: Space Shuttle Atlantis

Space Shuttle Atlantis
17 Nov. 2009 – Backdropped by Earth’s horizon and the blackness of space, a partial view of Space Shuttle Atlantis’ payload bay, vertical stabilizer, orbital maneuvering system (OMS) pods and docking mechanism are featured in this image photographed by an STS-129 crew member from an aft flight deck window.Spacewalks – Blue Sky: credit: NASA

Spacewalks - Blue Sky: Astronaut Randy Bresnik

21 Nov. 2009, Astronaut Randy Bresnik
Spacewalks – Blue Sky: credit: NASA

Spacewalks - Blue Sky: astronaut Robert Behnken

14 Feb. 2010, NASA astronaut Robert Behnken
Spacewalks – Blue Sky: credit: NASA

Spacewalks - Blue Sky: The STS-131 external fuel tank

The STS-131 external fuel tank
5 April 2010, Backdropped by a blue and white part of Earth, the STS-131 external fuel tank (ET) begins its relative separation from the Space Shuttle Discovery following launch. Spacewalks – Blue Sky: credit: NASA

Spacewalks - Blue Sky: Discovery's Remote Manipulator System

Discovery’s Remote Manipulator System
25 Feb. 2011, Controlled by the STS-133 astronauts inside Discovery’s cabin, the Remote Manipulator System/Orbiter Boom Sensor System (RMS/OBSS) equipped with special cameras, begins to conduct thorough inspections of the shuttle’s thermal tile system on flight daySpacewalks – Blue Sky: credit: NASA

Spacewalks - Blue Sky: Astronaut Stephen K. Robinson on ISS Canadaarm2

Astronaut Stephen K. Robinson on ISS Canadaarm2
3 August 2005, Astronaut Stephen K. Robinson, STS-114 mission specialist, anchored to a foot restraint on the International Space Station’s Canadarm2, participates in the mission’s third session of extravehicular activity (EVA). The blackness of space and Earth’s horizon form the backdrop for the image.Spacewalks – Blue Sky: credit: NASA

Spacewalks - Blue Sky: Moving HTV to a new docking port

Moving HTV to a new docking port
Busy day today: moved HTV to a new docking port. We are getting ready for space shuttle STS-133. Spacewalks – Blue Sky: credit: NASA/Paolo Nespoli

Spacewalks - Blue Sky: astronaut Mark C. Lee tests the new Simplified Aid for EVA Rescue -SAFER- system

Astronaut Mark C. Lee tests the new Simplified Aid for EVA Rescue (SAFER) system
16 Sept. 1994, Backdropped against the blue and white Earth, 130 nautical miles below, astronaut Mark C. Lee tests the new Simplified Aid for EVA Rescue (SAFER) system.Spacewalks – Blue Sky: credit: NASA

Spacewalks - Blue Sky: Astronaut Robert L. Curbeam

Astronaut Robert L. Curbeam
12 Dec. 2006 — Astronaut Robert L. Curbeam, Jr., STS-116 mission specialist, participates in the mission’s first of three planned sessions of extravehicular activity (EVA) as construction resumes on the International Space Station. Spacewalks – Blue Sky: credit: NASA

Spacewalks - Blue Sky: ISS Backdropped by a blue Earth, with shadow from Shuttle Endeavour moving away

ISS Backdropped by a blue Earth, with shadow from Shuttle Endeavour moving away
19 Aug. 2007 — Backdropped by a blue Earth, the International Space Station moves away from Space Shuttle Endeavour.Spacewalks – Blue Sky: credit: NASA

One Comment

  1. Everything is so real….but it is a fiction I think!
    But if is real?…….How come the Moon is so gray compare with other pictures!!!!
    I don’t have very much experience in this subject NASA. But what they want to demonstrate is not real for me!
    I am a Catholic and I believe in All the sky family and so I race my son the same way!
    That’s why he said all the time that Jesus is his friend.We believe in him and in his mother Holly Mary!
    No! a computer can make so many videos with fictions!……no.no.no!

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *