Banksy – Guerilla art wrapped in mystery and controversy [35 pics]

Bansky Truck

Banksy Truck

Photo credit: Banksy

Introduction

Banksy, an anonymous England based graffiti artist, political activist, film director and painter, is probably the most popular, yet most mysterious, urban street artist in the world. He has become an internationally known as a subversive graffiti artist – yet manages to maintain a secret identity. However, many newspapers assert that his real name is Robert or Robin Banks.
He is a counter-cultural prankster, but has art in major cosmopolitan galleries around the globe. Banksy made his name with his trademark stencil-style ‘guerrilla’ art in public spaces – on walls in London, Brighton, Bristol and even on the West Bank barrier separating Israelis and Palestinians – his works have sold for hundreds of thousands of dollars.

He has dozens of celebrity collectors including Brad Pitt, Angelina Jolie and Christina Aguilera. It is hard to find good facts about the art so some captions in this article might have the wrong name of the art. In case you know what the correct name is, please let us know and we’ll change it. [35 pictures]

Hint: Use “J” and “K” keys (after the page finish loading) to navigate from picture to picture.

Banksy art: Picnic

Banksy art: Picnic

At the guerilla artist Banksy’s L.A. show in 2006, Angelina Jolie  spent nearly $400,000 on three pieces of his work. Jolie snatched up “Picnic”, that alone cost $226,000. Photo credit: Banksy

Banksy art: Laugh now but one day we'll be in charge

Banksy art: Laugh now but one day we’ll be in charge

Photo credit: Banksy

Banksy art: The bad artist imitate, the good artist steal

Banksy art: The bad artist imitate, the good artist steal

Photo credit: Banksy

Banksy street art: escaping

Banksy street art: escaping

Photo credit: Banksy

Banksy art: Maid

Banksy art: Maid

Photo credit: Banksy


Banksy art: Choppers with pink ribbon

Banksy art: Choppers with pink ribbon

Photo credit: Banksy

Banksy art: Flowerchucker

Banksy art: Flowerchucker

Photo credit: Banksy

Banksy art: Attacking carts

Banksy art: Attacking carts

Photo credit: Banksy

Banksy art: Moisturizing

Banksy art: Moisturizing

Photo credit: Banksy

Banksy street art: Graffiti cleaner

Banksy street art: Graffiti cleaner

Graffiti depicting graffiti removal by Banksy. Created in May 2008 at Leake Street in London, painted over by August 2008. Notice the animals resembling cave art from Lascaux or Altamira. Photo credit: Banksy

Banksy street art: Naked man

Banksy street art: Naked man

‘Naked Man’ – on the wall of a sexual health clinic in Park Street, Bristol. Following popular support, the City Council have decided it will be allowed to remain. Photo credit: Banksy

Banksy street art: death

Banksy street art: Death

Stencil on the waterline of The Thekla, an entertainment boat in central Bristol. The image of Death is based on a 19th century etching illustrating the pestilence of The Great Stink.  Photo credit: Banksy

Banksy street art: One nation under CCTV

Banksy street art: One nation under CCTV

Located in Central London. A group of gentlemen badgered the Royal Mail about construction work that needed doing on one of the walls. After many requests the Royal Mail eventually agreed to let these “builders” put up scaffolding and sort out whatever problem there was. 6 days later the scaffolding came down and ‘one nation under CCTV’ was all that remained. It can be seen from far off and many people are drawn to it without even realizing it’s a Banksy. Despite attempts to save it this piece is no longer there. The only difference the public support made was that it was painted over (in March 2009), as opposed to removed. Photo credit: Banksy/ogglog

Banksy street art: Livin the Dream

Banksy street art: Livin’ the Dream

Photo credit: Banksy

Banksy street art: Boxhead

Banksy street art: Boxhead

Photo credit: Banksy

Banksy street art:

Banksy street art:

Photo credit: Banksy

Banksy street art: Charlie Burn

Banksy street art: Charlie Burn

Photo credit: Banksy

Banksy art: Donot escort

Banksy art: Donot escort

Photo credit: Banksy

Banksy street art: yellow lines

Bansky street art: Yellow lines

Flower power: A double yellow line turns into a huge yellow flower – with artist ‘self-portrait’ – in London. Photo credit: Banksy

Banksy street art: dogwalker

Banksy street art: dogwalker

Photo credit: Banksy

Banksy street art: this looks a bit like an elephant

Banksy street art: this looks a bit like an elephant

Photo credit: Banksy

Banksy street art: 0% interest in people

Banksy street art: 0% interest in people

Photo credit: Banksy

Banksy street art: behind the wall

Banksy street art: behind the wall

The ‘Wall project”  invoke a virtual reality that underlines the negation of humanity that the barrier represents — children in areas cut off from any access to the sea playing with sand buckets and spades on piles of rubble that look like sand, and corners of the wall peeled back to reveal imagined lush landscapes behind. Photo credit: Banksy

Banksy art: I Hate Mondays

Banksy art: I Hate Mondays

Photo credit: Banksy

Banksy street art: No Loitering

Banksy street art: No Loitering

A man in a rocking chair sitting and waiting for America so save him. Photo credit: Banksy/wikicommons

Banksy street art: No Future

Banksy street art: No Future

Photo credit: Banksy

Banksy street art: One original thought is worth a thousand quotings

Banksy street art: One original thought is worth a thousand quotings

Photo credit: Banksy

Banksy street art: Park (ing)

Banksy street art: Park (ing)

Photo credit: Banksy

Banksy art: Rickshaw

Banksy art: Rickshaw

Photo credit: Banksy

Banksy street art: Sperm alarm

Banksy street art: Sperm alarm

Photo credit: Banksy

Banksy street art: I remember when all this was trees

Banksy street art: I remember when all this was trees

Photo credit: Banksy

Banksy street art: No trespassing

Banksy street art: No trespassing

Photo credit: Banksy

Banksy portrait

Banksy portrait

Photo credit: Banksy

Banksy street art: Because I'm worthless

Banksy art: Tourists

Photo credit: Banksy

24 Comments

  1. Well known vandal, Banksy (age unknown), has been selling his art for hundreds of thousands of dollars. This has been met with scorn by various art experts posting anonymously on the net. The critique can be summarised as it being unappropriate for a graffiti artist to be able to live off his art, as he has previously given it away freely on public walls, risking legal action, just to have it painted over by authorities.

    This, of course, being opposed to conventional artists who attempt to charge money for their art from the very start, thus being legit. Charging payment for one’s work is what separates professionals from amateurs. Mother Theresa, in that sense, was an amateur care taker of street children.

    Once an artist – or anyone else – has chosen to donate their labour to society at large, they are considered to have claimed the moral high ground and, for this reason, are barred from ever being able to support themselves through that field of work on pain of being called “sellout” on internet forums.

    There seems to be a moral to this story, but I can’t for the life of me think of what it might be.

  2. Vandalism, pure and simple. Our society is so fucked up we celebrate minor criminals. And mindless Hollywood cunts will shell out more money than most people will see in two lifetimes to own a piece of this shit. LOL. Fools. I don’t want to live on this planet anymore.

    • Vandalism is destructive. If he were shoving hammers through people’s walls, or keying cars, that would be vandalism. This is art. Honestly, I think it’s entirely ridiculous that artists don’t have more freedoms. It’s a boring wall, or a fairly useless billboard. Big deal. It’s more interesting now. Sure, spray-painting your name onto something is vandalism. Creating a mural? Not so much.

    • I don’t think it is a minor criminal that we are celebrating, but a message trying to get through to the real fools, like you. The photo saying ‘I remember when all of this was trees’ Is surely a reminder of better times, which you are calling vandalism. Vandalism on an area that has already been vandalized by the existence of humans, maybe. I wouldn’t want to live on the planet anymore if I were you, either, DAVE. “LOL”

    • People celebrate the idea he stands for. You call it Vandalism, I call it art. What makes your opinion worth anything at all? You’re just an angry little man screaming at the world through your computer screen, seething mad at the success and impact that this man is having on a global scale. I hope you get past your hate and anger, brother.

      • Even if those are nice pieces of work, they’re still vandalism. A private property is no place for outsiders for being “artistic”. He could paint sheets. No matter how you like Bansky or other grafitti artists – when they put their “work” at someone else’s walls, they’re going against the law.
        I even like some of his ideas, but I can’t stand invasion and disrespect.

    • We don’t want you here, either. Especially if you can’t see the legitimacy behind most of his works. Move along. LOL. Ignorant cunt. LOLLOL.

  3. “yeah, banksy, youre a twat, stole the work of Blek Le Rat.”

    Are we not BORED with this yet? This is not radical- this is inane illustration. This is not making us change anything, this is entertainment for the stupid.

  4. A sign of the times … it is for all to see and take whatever meaning they want from it. Whether he sells to Hollywood Icons or not is not the point, in fact good on him, we are all here to make a living, like it or not. At least we get to see and feel his art, better than sticking it in a gallery for rich people.

    • @kim #15 absolutely is a banksy. part of his CA/vegas romp back in 2010-11. that one was on the I-15 heading into Las Vegas, and advertising mega-conglomerate Clearchannel (who owned the billboard Banksy “defaced”) took it down soon after to “get rid of the graffiti.” So did they just whitewash over such distasteful vandalism? No, they pulled down and preserved the entire fucking billboard to sell at auction. Clearchannel condemned Banksy for effectively creating a better advertisement that generated more publicity for the hotel, and Vegas as a (w)hole, and, let’s face it, captured the essence of Las Vegas better than the initial advertisement could.

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