When Lightning Strikes! Extreme Instability [19 Pics]

Lightning: Northern South Dakota

Lightning: Northern South Dakota

Storm produces frequently lightning in northern South Dakota, June 16, 2010. Several longer exposures stacked. Image Credit (and all rights reserved by): extremeinstability.com


Introduction

When mother nature is mad this is what it looks like. I can totally relate to how the old Vikings had a God (Thor) for this incredible phenomenon. Yet again, the photographer Mike Hollingshead (who runs the extremeinstability.com website) provides us with insane photographs.

From the discharge of atmospheric electricity (lightning), a leader of a bolt of lightning can travel at speeds of 220,000 km/h (140,000 mph), and can reach temperatures approaching 30,000 °C (54,000 °F).

How lightning initially forms is still a matter of debate. Scientists have studied root causes ranging from atmospheric perturbations (wind, humidity, friction, and atmospheric pressure) to the impact of solar wind and accumulation of charged solar particles.

The irrational fear of lightning (and thunder) is astraphobia. [19 pictures]

Hint: Use “J” and “K” keys (after the page finish loading) to navigate from picture to picture.

Lightning: Over Flood waters

Lightning over flood waters

I did some stacking of images here. Point the camera one direction, take shots without moving it, then you can stack them later in photoshop. All lightning photography is a long exposure. This is the same thing, just long exposure using several exposures. Lot cleaner images this way. I under exposed a good bit, thinking I’d get some bright close one if I opened up anymore. Photo Credit (and all rights reserved by): extremeinstability.com

Lightning: Over Flood waters

Lightning over flood waters 2

Photo Credit (and all rights reserved by): extremeinstability.com

Lightning: Over Flood waters

Lightning over flood – Blair, Missouri River

Well I’d been hoping to get some lightning shots over the flood waters north of Blair. (2011 Historic Missouri River Flooding). I Finally got a couple decent nights. I’m a real big lightning chicken, unless I’m in my car, then I’m cool if it hits 10 feet away. Photo Credit (and all rights reserved by): extremeinstability.com

Lightning: Over Flood waters

Lightning over flood waters

These are all out on that edge, out in the open. I was just shooting the far off stuff for another stack, but noticing a closer area flickering away to the right. Photo Credit (and all rights reserved by): extremeinstability.com

Lightning: Over Flood waters

Lightning over flood waters

This night was a bit better than the first one here, largely due to less rain. And it was a hair easier to determine nothing was flickering above you. So this time I got a lot more of them from the edge and not from the car. Photo Credit (and all rights reserved by): extremeinstability.com

Lightning: Colors in the clouds

Lightning produces beautiful colors in the clouds

Omaha lights responsible for most of that down there on the right half. Cargil still getting the stuff more above me. Photo Credit (and all rights reserved by): extremeinstability.com

Extreme Instability: Noctilucent Clouds

Lightning: yellow and pink

All still water that shouldn’t be there. Photo Credit (and all rights reserved by): extremeinstability.com

North Omaha TV Tower Lightning

North Omaha TV Tower Lightning

I measured on google earth how far this is from the towers. It’s around 3,000 feet. Tip that close tower over and stack it on itself twice and it would almost be to me (1300 feet tall).  Sitting in my drivers seat you don’t see the tops of those, not even close. You have to leave way over to see the tops. When I’d see a close flash, Photo Credit (and all rights reserved by): extremeinstability.com

North Omaha TV Tower Lightning

North Omaha TV Tower Lightning

I get 8 bolts to hit in an hour and a half. This from the most pathetic area of storms ever. You just don’t need much for tower bolts. If you ever get a good anvil crawler display going overhead, find some TV towers (taller the better, don’t mess with lower towers you see all over…you’ll waste your time). Photo Credit (and all rights reserved by): extremeinstability.com

Lightning: Over Flood waters

Lightning over flood waters

Photo Credit (and all rights reserved by): extremeinstability.com

Western Nebraska Storms

Western Nebraska Storms

Photo Credit (and all rights reserved by): extremeinstability.com

Western Nebraska Storms

Western Nebraska Storms

Photo Credit (and all rights reserved by): extremeinstability.com

Lightning, stars and the moon

Lightning, stars and the moon

Alrington Nebraska Storm. Photo Credit (and all rights reserved by): extremeinstability.com

Lightning: Orange sky

Lightning: Orange sky

Photo Credit (and all rights reserved by): Extreme Instability

Extreme Instability: Truck Stop and Twilight Supercell

Extreme Instability: Truck Stop and Twilight Supercell

Amazing supercell storm during twilight nears a York Nebraska truck stop on I80 as it spits out lightning, June 17, 2009. Only a half or so earlier this storm was producing a long-lived large tornado near Aurora Nebraska. Photo Credit (and all rights reserved by): extremeinstability.com

Lightning storm

Lightning storm

Photo Credit (and all rights reserved by): extremeinstability.com

Stars and Strom lit up by lightning

Stars and Strom lit up by lightning

I eventually move east of York and pull over again. The skinny updraft wanted nothing to do with death. BAM these amazingly bright botls would smash down out of the updraft/anvil interface. A couple lit up/froze the storms features in the darkness. Photo Credit (and all rights reserved by): extremeinstability.com

Lightning over Devil's Tower

Lightning over Devil’s Tower

Photo Credit (and all rights reserved by): extremeinstability.com




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